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"Appeals to fairness have proven surprisingly uncompelling to most people when it comes to fat rights."

The appeal to fairness and equity is of course logical. Most thoughtful people agree that discrimination just isn’t okay and should not be tolerated. However, appeals to fairness have proven surprisingly uncompelling to most people when it comes to fat rights. The main reason appears to be that most people believe that fatness is a personal choice, a result of poor lifestyle habits, and that individuals deserve to hold responsibility for their choice. After all, the argument goes, if fat people want to escape discrimination, they should just lose weight – and thinner people should not have to absorb the costs of someone else’s fatness, whether it’s about sitting in a cramped seat or the taxes incurred from health care costs. In effect, this attitude often justifies more discrimination, with the belief that the unfair treatment may motivate people to lose weight.  

~Linda Bacon, co-author of Body Respect, at the 2009 NAAFA conference

Oh, btw, such discrimination is more likely to make someone fatter, not thinner (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oby.20891/abstract)

Have you ever read the diagnostic criteria for anorexia? "Used by the DSM-V as an indicator of the level of severity of anorexia nervosa. The DSM-V states these as follows: Mild: BMI of 17-17.99 Moderate: BMI of 16-16.99 Severe: BMI of 15-15.99 Extreme: BMI of less than 15" I fully acknowledge that people can have anorexic tendencies/ disordered eating habits and still be overweight (I myself have) but anorexia is classified as extreme weight loss. Please don't be encouraging obese people to

Question asked by thefunky--buddha

Answer:

thisisthinprivilege:

[continued - diagnose themselves with Anorexia. That’s so dangerous and so so insulting for people struggling or recovering from anorexia]

People forget that the DSM was created by PEOPLE through what they have constructed as a disease and is only a guideline to follow to get a diagnosis. It isn’t something that should be followed to the letter or used to exclude people, especially if you are considering that much of our medical knowledge is socially constructed. In our society we believe fat people shouldn’t be fat so they haven’t acknowledged that fat people can have an eating disorder let alone anorexia due to the belief fat people should lose weight no matter what.

The guidelines wouldn’t even fit MOST thin people who have anorexia as everyone doesn’t fall into the weight range needed for the diagnosis if someone were to follow the DSM completely. Also, the weight range the DSM mentions is only ONE part of many that form a diagnosis. People can die before they get to that weight range or lose their menses. The physical damage done to people’s bodies can happen at any stage, particularly damage to the heart when someone isn’t getting the right amount of calories or nutrients. That has NOTHING to do with the amount of subcutaneous fat someone has.

What’s insulting are people who need to call us “obese” and feel so threatened by fat people acknowledging they too have disordered eating and have the same symptoms as thin people who are anorexic. We’re not taking anything away from anyone else with that diagnosis except challenging the narratives and language around anorexia. The very use of the word “normal” when describing what weight range people should be in ”85% of normal” needs to be deconstructed. Who’s normal? Is it “normal” on a BMI chart? Is it normal based on the individual? I’m 250 pounds. If I lost 25% of my body weight by starving I would still be considered “obese” and doctors would look it over as a positive thing. Instead of what it actually was, a massive weight loss that would be categorized as anorexia if my body type was included in the construction of how things like the DSM give guidelines for a diagnosis. 

So anyone who finds it insulting that people with mental and physical health problems are attempting to get their issues fixed needs to find something else to complain about. Everyone has the right to good medical care and to not have their problems be brushed off as positive. Doesn’t matter what weight they are.

Oh and to answer your original question, yes. I’ve not only read the DSM but I’ve taken graduate level coursework that deconstructs and challenges the very basis of how they diagnose conditions. The DSM is regularly challenged by researchers and doctors as it is only a guideline (and again is socially constructed).

-FBP

The Rules for Being Fat

loniemc:

#1. Never be seen eating in public.

#2. If you must eat, make sure it is uber-healthy yet tasteless. Never eat anything that is fattening, sweet, or tasty in any way.

#3. Exercise daily to the point of vomiting. This cannot be fun exercise like dancing or skating (who wants to see that!). It must be boring and miserable.

#4. Never be seen exercising in public; you must only exercise in your own home. We don’t want even the possibility of seeing a little fat jiggle. If you break this rule, we reserve the right to call you names and throw trash at you.

#5. You must be on a diet at all times. Preferably, you must be paying for it in some way. We need you to keep supporting the 104+ (Canada & the US) billion dollar diet industry. Yes, we know that you will only gain the weight back plus more. That is part of our plan!

#6. Take diet pills. They may give you a stroke or damage your heart, but you will lose 2-5% of your weight as long as you eat right and exercise as well. Of course, you will gain it back the minute you stop taking the drug.

#7. If a diet does not work, go have your stomach amputated or squeezed (weight loss surgery). You might die of complications. You will be 4x more likely to kill yourself than the rest of the population. If you don’t die, you will most likely have long-term complications and nutritional deficiencies that will reduce your quality of life significantly. You also have an excellent chance of becoming an alcoholic. Oh, and 80% of you will regain the weight.

#8. All your attention, your money, and your focus must be on the fruitless task of losing weight at all times. Nothing else matters. You should never have a life until you succeed at that, no matter that 95% of you will fail and that those who succeed where likely thin folks losing some weight they had gained.

#9. Wear dark, shapeless clothing for which you must pay outrageously. No bright colors or stylishness of any kind.

#10. Never wear anything that lets your flesh be seen. No sleeveless shirts, no shorts, and definitely NO BATHING SUITS!

#11. Never be seen having a good time with friends in public. We want to believe you are sitting home miserable. We certainly do not want to see you laugh.

#12. Never imagine that someone could want you romantically. Love is not for the likes of you. If you do get into a relationship and they happen to be abusive, suck it up and be happy someone bothers to interact with you in any way.

#13. If you break rule #12 and end up in a relationship, never show affection in public. This is especially true if your SO is fat.

#14. If you have children, they must eat perfectly. If they are fat also, we may come take them away.

#15. If you are a fat woman and you get raped, be glad for the attention.

#16. Work daily to blend into the shadows. Never remind us that you are there. We don’t want to see you.

#17. Never expect to have friends. If you do have friends and are female, accept that they might keep you around to make them look good. If you are male, make them laugh, fatty.

#18. Either be very quiet or jolly. Never, ever let us see you angry or upset. Take how we treat you and stuff it.

#19. Never pursue a higher education. If you break this rule and do, don’t you dare complain about accommodations. So what if you class does not have a desk that fits you?

#20. Never pursue a professional career. We don’t want to see the likes of you in our courtrooms or our offices. You won’t be able to find fashionable professional clothes anyway.

#21. Never complain when you are denied a job because of your looks.

#22. If we deign to employ you, never expect to receive the same pay as your coworkers; just be happy that we gave you a job.

#23. Never expect to get a promotion. We could not reward a fat person for anything.

#24. Go to the doctor often. The doctor will tell you that anything wrong with you could be fixed by losing weight. Never complain or speak up in response. Pay your money, hang your head in shame and get out.

#25. Never tell a thin person that thin shaming and fat oppression are different. Never point out that thin shaming is part of the hatred of fat. Never note that thin shaming is calling people names while fat oppression leads to lack of health care options, lack of job options and lack of acceptance in society.

#26. Never tell feminists or diversity advocates that fat belongs as a protected condition. You should not be protected, because you could change it if you really wanted to, fatty.

#27. Never be an academic that focuses on fat studies. We won’t publish your work, even if it is rigorous and well-written. We will keep you from tenure-track jobs. If you do land one of those, we just might deny you tenure.

#28. Never succeed at anything. If you do, we will point out that it doesn’t really count since you are still fat.

#29. Never stand up, stand out or speak up in any way. This would be glorifying obesity. We can’t have that.

#30. Whatever you do, NEVER become a fat activist and point out that society treats fat people unfairly. How dare you question our abuse and oppression of you!

nursenightingayle:

We as medical providers are doing something very, very wrong when patients avoid coming to the doctor because they know how emotionally horrible they’re going to feel afterward. Why? Because we’re dismissing all their concerns with no explanation except “you’re fat.” Because instead of commenting on their progress, we are telling them they haven’t lost “enough.” Because we are not acknowledging that it can be difficult or impossible to lose weight. Because we are using “lose weight” as a shortcut phrase instead of giving good advice on specific, helpful health behaviors. Because we, MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS, think that when we see someone is fat, that’s all we need to know about our health status.

All those things are wrong, and we have got to stop this, because THIS CAUSES HARM.

(via thisisthinprivilege)

"bell hooks says that “[b]eing oppressed means the absence of choices.” As a fat person, I only have two choices: a life of subjugation or a life of resistance."

The life of subjugation is that life were I believe that I am bad for being fat. I am expected to constantly be trying to lose weight at all costs. I am expected to be the good fatty and wear dark colors while I sit in the corner and try to hide. I should never stand up, never stand out, and always apologize for people having to look at me.

A life of resistance simply means living. If I choose to wear anything that stands out – bright colors, fun prints, anything with style or panache – I am pegged as a rebel. If I choose to have a career in the spotlight, I obviously do not know my place. If I have a good time in public, I’m shoving my fat in people’s faces. If I choose to stand out in any way, I am glorifying obesity.

As a fat person, I only have two choices: to die quietly in the shadows or to buck the system. This is an “absence of choices.” This is a lack of options. This is oppression.

—Lonie McMichael, from the upcoming book, The Unloved child: collateral damage in the war on obesity. (via loniemc)

loniemc:

thisisthinprivilege:

vikingspacebees:

thisisthinprivilege:

everybodygetssolow:

homo-sweet-homo:

Thin privilege is when the doctor does not assume you are diabetic or have high-blood pressure every time you’re sick.

That isn’t thin privilege… Fatter people are more prone to having these sorts of health problems, so therefore the doctor would need to rule these things out as possible reasons for illness.

This comment is thin privilege.

The problem isn’t that doctors look at an overweight patient and see those conditions as a possibility, the problem is that they act as though those are the only possibilities. They also often see them as the most likely or only possibilities even if the symptoms don’t add up.

Yyyyyyyup.

I went to a doctor three weeks ago, knowing the problem was my thyroid. She said it probably wasn’t and hinted that I probably have diabetes. She ran a full battery of tests. Guess what was the only thing out of whack? My thyroid. My blood sugar wasn’t even in the “pre-diabetic” range.

That is the third doctor I’ve had this experience with THIS SUMMER. One doctor just knew it could not be my thyroid and hinted that the problems would go away if I lost weight (the one who gave me too much thyroid med and put me in the hospital with afib because of it — couldn’t have me gaining weight, you know). One thought I was depressed (she decided this after looking at me and asking me one question about my sleep habits) and tried to put me on anti-depressants within 5 minutes of meeting me.

I had to pay extra for all those tests. Doctors on my insurance would not listen to me, didn’t actually address the problem — and I’m out the money for the copays. To fix the problem, I actually had to go pay out of my pocket for a doctor who is off my insurance. I’m lucky since I have good insurance and can pay this stuff, though it does drain my finances. Someone without the resources would have just been out of luck!

The entire time I was running around trying to get help, I was barely functioning. I hardly had enough energy to do my job — let alone have a life outside of it.

The assumption that we must have diseases associated with fat cost us time, money, and a great deal of frustration and heart-ache. Don’t tell me this habit is helpful or even harmless!

"[T]he number one attribute required for a fat activist to be a success is perseverance. Whether it be advocacy or teaching or writing or whatever, sticking to it is the most important action on days when I feel like I am beating my head against the wall. I have to remind myself that I make a difference. I have to remember that success is relative and that failure only comes from quitting. I get frustrated some days when I feel like the world is unchangeable, then I will find proof that together fat activists are changing the world one reader at a time. Perseverance is a requirement for the fat activist."

~Lonie McMichael, Acceptable Prejudice?

I will add that I had to learn to take breaks, though! Getting away from the madness, without quitting, is important, too.

(via loniemc)

bumsquash:

materiajunkie:

"Curing AIDS? Shit, that’s like Cadillac making a car that lasts for 50 years. And you know they can do it, but they ain’t going to do nothing that fucking dumb. Shit, they got metal on the Space Shuttle that can go around the Moon and withstand  temperatures of up to 20,000 degrees, you mean to tell me you don’t think they can make an El Dorado with a fuckin’ bumper that don’t fall off?"
- Chris Rock (“Bigger and Blacker”, 1999)

that last line.
bumsquash:

materiajunkie:

"Curing AIDS? Shit, that’s like Cadillac making a car that lasts for 50 years. And you know they can do it, but they ain’t going to do nothing that fucking dumb. Shit, they got metal on the Space Shuttle that can go around the Moon and withstand  temperatures of up to 20,000 degrees, you mean to tell me you don’t think they can make an El Dorado with a fuckin’ bumper that don’t fall off?"
- Chris Rock (“Bigger and Blacker”, 1999)

that last line.
bumsquash:

materiajunkie:

"Curing AIDS? Shit, that’s like Cadillac making a car that lasts for 50 years. And you know they can do it, but they ain’t going to do nothing that fucking dumb. Shit, they got metal on the Space Shuttle that can go around the Moon and withstand  temperatures of up to 20,000 degrees, you mean to tell me you don’t think they can make an El Dorado with a fuckin’ bumper that don’t fall off?"
- Chris Rock (“Bigger and Blacker”, 1999)

that last line.
bumsquash:

materiajunkie:

"Curing AIDS? Shit, that’s like Cadillac making a car that lasts for 50 years. And you know they can do it, but they ain’t going to do nothing that fucking dumb. Shit, they got metal on the Space Shuttle that can go around the Moon and withstand  temperatures of up to 20,000 degrees, you mean to tell me you don’t think they can make an El Dorado with a fuckin’ bumper that don’t fall off?"
- Chris Rock (“Bigger and Blacker”, 1999)

that last line.
bumsquash:

materiajunkie:

"Curing AIDS? Shit, that’s like Cadillac making a car that lasts for 50 years. And you know they can do it, but they ain’t going to do nothing that fucking dumb. Shit, they got metal on the Space Shuttle that can go around the Moon and withstand  temperatures of up to 20,000 degrees, you mean to tell me you don’t think they can make an El Dorado with a fuckin’ bumper that don’t fall off?"
- Chris Rock (“Bigger and Blacker”, 1999)

that last line.

bumsquash:

materiajunkie:

"Curing AIDS? Shit, that’s like Cadillac making a car that lasts for 50 years. And you know they can do it, but they ain’t going to do nothing that fucking dumb. Shit, they got metal on the Space Shuttle that can go around the Moon and withstand  temperatures of up to 20,000 degrees, you mean to tell me you don’t think they can make an El Dorado with a fuckin’ bumper that don’t fall off?"

- Chris Rock (“Bigger and Blacker”, 1999)

that last line.